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Mike Evangelist (yep, that’s his name) still remembers one of his first meetings with Jobs. It took place in the Apple boardroom in early 2000, just a few months after Apple purchased the American division of Astarte, a German software company where Evangelist was an operations manager. Phil Schiller, Apple’s longtime head of marketing, put Evangelist on a team charged with coming up with ideas for a DVD-burning program that Apple planned to release on high-end Macs — an app that would later become iDVD.

“We had about three weeks to prepare,” Evangelist says. He and another employee went to work creating beautiful mock-ups depicting the perfect interface for the new program. On the appointed day, Evangelist and the rest of the team gathered in the boardroom. They’d brought page after page of prototype screen shots showing the new program’s various windows and menu options, along with paragraphs of documentation describing how the app would work.

“Then Steve comes in,” Evangelist recalls. “He doesn’t look at any of our work. He picks up a marker and goes over to the whiteboard. He draws a rectangle. ‘Here’s the new application,’ he says. ‘It’s got one window. You drag your video into the window. Then you click the button that says burn. That’s it. That’s what we’re going to make.’ ”

From http://www.fastcompany.com/node/1659056/print

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2 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. By In Defense of the Green Screenz | Ed Carp on 13 Oct 2014 at 9:22 am

    […] While making access to data 24/7 on as many platforms as possible isn’t a bad thing at all, there’s a price to pay when you wrap data up in layers of HTML, XML, Javascript, images, etc., that we often don’t notice. I just finished a prototype application for a friend – all it does is issue a simple SQL query, return and display data – and she was stunned at how fast the thing worked. The response time was well under a second. Her comment was that she usually had to wait several seconds for data to be returned from a web query. It’s a so-called “green screen” CRUD (create/read/update/delete) application, written in C for Linux. It’s blazingly fast because it doesn’t load anything she doesn’t need to see – no graphics, fancy fonts, ads, HTML markup. No time wasted rendering data. Just text data and prompts – and it’s very clear what’s being displayed. (If you want to see pictures, just scroll down in my timeline to earlier in the week.) In short, it’s clean and simple. If you want to know what Steve Jobs, the legendary genius who headed Apple for years, thought about this approach, you can read about it here. […]

  2. By In Defense of the Green Screen | Ed Carp on 13 Oct 2014 at 9:31 am

    […] While making access to data 24/7 on as many platforms as possible isn’t a bad thing at all, there’s a price to pay when you wrap data up in layers of HTML, XML, Javascript, images, etc., that we often don’t notice. I just finished a prototype application for a friend – all it does is issue a simple SQL query, return and display data – and she was stunned at how fast the thing worked. The response time was well under a second. Her comment was that she usually had to wait several seconds for data to be returned from a web query. It’s a so-called “green screen” CRUD (create/read/update/delete) application, written in C for Linux. It’s blazingly fast because it doesn’t load anything she doesn’t need to see – no graphics, fancy fonts, ads, HTML markup. No time wasted rendering data. Just text data and prompts – and it’s very clear what’s being displayed. (If you want to see pictures, just scroll down in my timeline to earlier in the week.) In short, it’s clean and simple. If you want to know what Steve Jobs, the legendary genius who headed Apple for years, thought about this approach, you can read about it here. […]

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